National Day of Mourning - April 28

Last Update: Tue, 1 May 2018  |  SHARE   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Day of Mourning

The National Day of Mourning, held annually on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress. The Day of Mourning has since spread to about 80 countries around the world and has been adopted by the AFL-CIO and the International Confederation of Free Trade.

The numbers tell the story. In 2015, 802 workplace deaths were recorded in Canada; this represents more than 2.3 deaths every single day.

The Canadian flag is flown at half-mast from sunrise to sunset on all federal government buildings, including on Parliament Hill. Workers and employees observe this day in various ways including lighting candles, donning ribbons and black armbands, and observing a moment of silence at 11:00 hrs.

The purpose of Day of Mourning is twofold- to remember and honor those lives lost or injured and to renew the commitment to improving health and safety in the workplace.

As much as this is a day to remember the dead, it is also a call to protect the living.

Each year on this day, our provinces renew commitments to improve occupational health and safety in the workplace.

Provincial Legislatures will read the names of those who lost their lives to their work into the Provincial Records. The Canadian Labour Congress inscribes the names in the National Registry in Ottawa.

Closer to Home

In our home cities, on April 28 we pay our respects to, and remember, the thousands of workers who have been killed, injured or suffered illness as a result of work-related incidents.

We also honor the many families and friends who have been deeply affected by these tragedies.

Every worker has the right to return home safe and sound at the end of each workday.

By working together – with employers, workers and our health and safety partners – we can prevent worker injuries and deaths before they occur.

Manitoba recorded 16 workplace deaths in 2016. (2017 statistics were not available at time of publication)

Alberta lost 166 men and women to workplace deaths in 2017.

Saskatchewan recorded 27 workplace deaths in 2017.

Canadian Labour Congress Day of Mourning Ceremonies 2018 Manitoba Saskatchewan and Alberta are listed below

 

Manitoba

ORGANIZATION
EVENT and ADDRESS
DATE and TIME
CONTACT
WEBSITE

Manitoba Federation of Labour (MFL)

Combined with Safe Workers of Tomorrow (SWOT) event

10:30 am – Remarks at Union Centre, 275 Broadway Avenue
11:00 am SWOT annual walk from Union Center to Memorial Park
11:00 am – Sod turning for
Worker’s Memorial and speeches at Memorial Park,
Winnipeg

Friday, April 27 from 10:30 am to 11:30 am

Greg McFarlane,
MFL Special Projects
204-947-1400

Peter Reimer,
SWOT Executive Director
204-992-2988

 

Brandon and District Labour Council

Memorial Ceremony
City Hall, 410 – 9thStreet, Brandon

Saturday, April 28 at 2:00 pm

Kirk Carr, President
204-726-9570

 

Dauphin Labour Committee

 

Memorial March/Walk from MGEU Office, 322 Main Street, to City Hall, Dauphin

Saturday, April 28 at 12:00 pm

David Rehaluk, President
davidrehaluk@yahoo.ca

 

Thompson Labour Committee and United Steel Workers (USW)

Memorial Ceremony at USW Hall
19 Elizabeth Drive, Thompson

Saturday, April 28 at 2:00 pm

Gord Medwid,
USW Local 6166 VP

 

 

Saskatchewan

ORGANIZATION
EVENT and ADDRESS
DATE and TIME
CONTACT
WEBSITE

Regina and District Labour Council

Ceremony and Social
City Hall at Queen Elizabeth II Court, 2476 Victoria Avenue, Regina

Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am

(Luncheon to follow at the Regina Union Centre,
2709 12th Avenue)

Ken Kubian
kkubian@yahoo.ca
306-949-3705

 

Saskatoon and District Labour Council

Ceremony and Coffee
Frances Morrison Library
311 – 23rd Street East, Saskatoon

Saturday, April 28 at 2:00 pm

Don MacDonald
don.macdonald@sun-nurses.sk.ca

 

 

Yorkton and District Labour Council

Ceremony
A-180 Broadway Street West, Yorkton

Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am

Helen Ferridge
306-641-2504

 

 

Moose Jaw and District Labour Council

Ceremony and Social
Moose Jaw Union Centre, 1402 Caribou Street West, Moose Jaw

Saturday, April 28 at 2:00 pm

Stacey Landin staceylandin@sasktel.net 306-631-6613

 

 

Weyburn and District Labour Council

Ceremony
TC Douglas Calvary Centre 10th Avenue, Weyburn

Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am

Wanda Bartlett
306-861-9100

wbartlett@sasktel.net

 

 

Alberta

 

 

 

 

ORGANIZATION
EVENT and ADDRESS
DATE and TIME
CONTACT
WEBSITE

Edmonton and District Labour

Ceremony at Broken Families Obelisk, Grant Notley Park, Edmonton

Saturday, April 28 at 2:00 pm

Greg Mady, President
office@edlc.ca

 

Wood Buffalo and District Labour Council (WBLC)

Ceremony
J. Howard Pew Memorial Family Park, McCormick Drive, Fort McMurray

Saturday, April 28 at 10:30 am

Shannon Tracy, Recording Secretary
Woodbuffalo.lc@gmail.com

 

Yellowhead Labour Council

Ceremony
Green Square
309 Gregg Avenue, Hinton

Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am

Linda Travers, President
traverslinda@gmail.com

 

Lethbridge and District Labour Council (LDLC)

Ceremony
1210 Scenic Drive South, Lethbridge

Saturday, April 28 at 11:30 am

Rick Merrick, President
merrickland@shaw.ca
403‑892-7088

 

Red Deer and District Labour Council (RDDLC)

Ceremony – Mayor will read Proclamation at City Hall
4914 48th Avenue,
Red Deer

Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am

Karen Reay, Secretary Treasurer
Rddlc1@gmail.com

 

Calgary and District Labour Council (CDLC)

Ceremony – Wreath Laying and Memorial Service
Calgary Workers Memorial

Edward Place Park, SE corner of City Hall, 9th Avenue and Macleod Trail SE, Calgary

Saturday, April 28 at 12:00 pm

Alex Shevalier, President
President@thecdlc.ca
403‑262-2390

 

The History behind National Day of Mourning

In 1984, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) began to celebrate Workers’ Memorial Day.

On April 28, 1985, the Canadian Labour Congress officially declared it an annual day of national remembrance.

In December 1990, the Workers Mourning Day Act passed in Parliament, making April 28 as the annual Canadian National Day of Mourning.

The Day of Mourning has since spread to about 80 countries around the world.

The National Day of Mourning focuses our attention on these workplace tragedies and reminds us that there is more work to do in the area of workplace health and safety.

Mourning Day Act

S.C. 1991, c. 15

An Act respecting a Day of Mourning for Persons Killed or Injured in the Workplace [Assented to 1st February, 1991]

WHEREAS it is desirable that Canadians should designate a day of mourning to remember workers killed, disabled or injured in the workplace and workers afflicted with industrial disease;

AND WHEREAS Canadians seek earnestly to set an example of their commitment to the issue of health and safety in the workplace;

NOW, THEREFORE, Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows

Short title

1.This Act may be cited as the Workers Mourning Day Act.

Day of Mourning

2. (1) Throughout Canada, in each and every year, the 28th day of April shall be known under the name of "Day of Mourning for Persons Killed or Injured in the Workplace".

(2) For greater certainty, the Day of Mourning for Persons Killed or Injured in the Workplace is not a legal holiday or a non-juridical day and shall not be required to be kept or observed as such.

Ed Bens
Prairie Council Member, Regina Head Office, and
Chair, COPE Local 397 OH&S Committee

 

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